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-! width="17%" | Room A - [http://www.law.georgetown.edu/webcast/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=1434 Video Streaming]+! width="17%" | Room A - <br > [http://www.law.georgetown.edu/webcast/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=1434 Video Streaming]
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''Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 3:45 PM - 5:15 PM''<br />Hart Auditorium <br />This plenary will "draw back the curtain" to examine how electronic health records (EHRs) and data exchanges will affect privacy in the US. The federal government is actively promoting untested systems for biosurveillance, research, use and disclosure of every American's health data, both inside and outside the healthcare system. <br /><u>Moderator:</u> ''Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 3:45 PM - 5:15 PM''<br />Hart Auditorium <br />This plenary will "draw back the curtain" to examine how electronic health records (EHRs) and data exchanges will affect privacy in the US. The federal government is actively promoting untested systems for biosurveillance, research, use and disclosure of every American's health data, both inside and outside the healthcare system. <br /><u>Moderator:</u>
'''Dr. Deborah Peel'''<nowiki>: Executive Director, Patient Privacy Rights </nowiki><br /><u>Panelists:</u><br />'''Michael Stearns, M.D., CPC, CFPC'''<nowiki>: President and Chief Executive Officer, e-MDs </nowiki><br /> '''Dr. Deborah Peel'''<nowiki>: Executive Director, Patient Privacy Rights </nowiki><br /><u>Panelists:</u><br />'''Michael Stearns, M.D., CPC, CFPC'''<nowiki>: President and Chief Executive Officer, e-MDs </nowiki><br />
-'''[http://www.mfrisse.com/Home/bio Mark Frisse, M.D.]'''<nowiki>: Professor of Management, Vanderbilt Owen Graduate School of Management; Accenture Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University </nowiki><br />'''[http://cgunter.web.cs.illinois.edu Carl Gunter, Ph.D.]'''<nowiki>: Director, Illinois Security Lab; Center for Health Information Privacy and Security; Strategic Advanced Research Projects on Security (SHARPS) </nowiki><br />'''Stephanie Perrin'''<nowiki>: University of Toronto</nowiki><br />'''[http://www.cdt.org/personnel/deven-mcgraw# Deven McGraw]'''<nowiki>: Director of the Health Privacy Project, Center for Democracy and Technology</nowiki><br />+'''[http://www.mfrisse.com/Home/bio Mark Frisse, M.D.]'''<nowiki>: Professor of Management, Vanderbilt Owen Graduate School of Management; Accenture Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University </nowiki><br />'''[http://cgunter.web.cs.illinois.edu Carl Gunter, Ph.D.]'''<nowiki>: Director, Illinois Security Lab; Center for Health Information Privacy and Security; Strategic Advanced Research Projects on Security (SHARPS) </nowiki><br />'''Stephanie Perrin'''<nowiki>: Canadian Privacy Expert </nowiki><br />'''[http://www.cdt.org/personnel/deven-mcgraw# Deven McGraw]'''<nowiki>: Director of the Health Privacy Project, Center for Democracy and Technology</nowiki><br />
'''Dave deBronkart'''<nowiki>: "e-Patient Dave" deBronkart, Cancer patient, blogger, speaker, health IT advocate, co-chair, Society for Participatory Medicine</nowiki><br />[[#Program|(Back to Top)]] '''Dave deBronkart'''<nowiki>: "e-Patient Dave" deBronkart, Cancer patient, blogger, speaker, health IT advocate, co-chair, Society for Participatory Medicine</nowiki><br />[[#Program|(Back to Top)]]
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===='''Social Justice in the Digital Information Age'''==== ===='''Social Justice in the Digital Information Age'''====
-''Thursday, June 16, 2011; 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM''<br />Room A <br />This round table discussion among civil rights and civil liberties experts in the US will consider a number of challenges to their work in the new millennium. Computing technology is integrating itself into every aspect of domestic life. Education, employment, and housing opportunities are found more and more often only online. Changing laws regarding the use of CCTV, traffic cameras, are blanketing the landscape with means for cash strapped regions to find new revenue. Employment opportunities are more often only available through web-forms that collect personal information that can be instantly matched with other data that could disqualify a candidate because of poor credit scores. Voting rights are on shifting ground that may require a host of actions by voters who have voted for decades in order for them to cast a ballot in next year's election. Immigrant or citizen there is no one way to know--but efforts at finding the way of knowing the difference, and then according civil rights to one while withholding rights to those who cannot pass the test. <br /><u>Moderator:</u> [http://www.law.stanford.edu/directory/profile/100/Joe%20W.%20%22Chip%22%20Pitts%20III/ '''Chip Pitts''']<nowiki>: Lecturer, Stanford Law School </nowiki><br /><u>Panelists:</u><br />'''Shahid Buttar'''<nowiki>: U.S. Bill of Rights Defense Committee (Modern COINTELPRO)</nowiki><br />'''Sharon Goott Nissim'''<nowiki>: Consumer Rights Counsel, EPIC (Employee Rights)</nowiki><br />'''Johnny Barnes'''<nowiki>: ACLU District of Columbia (Surveillance and Civil Liberties)</nowiki><br />'''Grisella M. Martinez'''<nowiki>: Director of Policy and Legislative Affairs</nowiki>, [http://www.immigrationforum.org/ National Immigration Forum]<br />'''Wendy Weiser''' [http://www.brennancenter.org/content/people/r_weiser_wendy Director of Democracy Program] <nowkiki>: Brennan Center for Justice New York Law<br /> School[[#Program|(Back to Top)]]<br />+''Thursday, June 16, 2011; 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM''<br />Room A <br />This round table discussion among civil rights and civil liberties experts in the US will consider a number of challenges to their work in the new millennium. Computing technology is integrating itself into every aspect of domestic life. Education, employment, and housing opportunities are found more and more often only online. Changing laws regarding the use of CCTV, traffic cameras, are blanketing the landscape with means for cash strapped regions to find new revenue. Employment opportunities are more often only available through web-forms that collect personal information that can be instantly matched with other data that could disqualify a candidate because of poor credit scores. Voting rights are on shifting ground that may require a host of actions by voters who have voted for decades in order for them to cast a ballot in next year's election. Immigrant or citizen there is no one way to know--but efforts at finding the way of knowing the difference, and then according civil rights to one while withholding rights to those who cannot pass the test. <br /><u>Moderator:</u> [http://www.law.stanford.edu/directory/profile/100/Joe%20W.%20%22Chip%22%20Pitts%20III/ '''Chip Pitts''']<nowiki>: Lecturer, Stanford Law School </nowiki><br /><u>Panelists:</u><br />'''Shahid Buttar'''<nowiki>: U.S. Bill of Rights Defense Committee (Modern COINTELPRO)</nowiki><br />'''Sharon Goott Nissim'''<nowiki>: Consumer Rights Counsel, EPIC (Employee Rights)</nowiki><br />'''Johnny Barnes'''<nowiki>: ACLU District of Columbia (Surveillance and Civil Liberties)</nowiki><br />'''Grisella M. Martinez'''<nowiki>: Director of Policy and Legislative Affairs</nowiki>, [http://www.immigrationforum.org/ National Immigration Forum]<br />'''Wendy Weiser''' [http://www.brennancenter.org/content/people/r_weiser_wendy Director of Democracy Program] Voting Rights <nowiki>: Brennan Center for Justice New York Law</nowiki><br /> School[[#Program|(Back to Top)]]<br />
===='''Automating Policing Functions: From Drones to Robo Ticketing, Is This the end of Police As we Know Them?'''==== ===='''Automating Policing Functions: From Drones to Robo Ticketing, Is This the end of Police As we Know Them?'''====

Current revision

Contents

Program

Tuesday, June 14, 2011
EST
(UTC 4)
Atrium Hart Auditorium - Video Streaming Room A -
Video Streaming
Room B Room C Room D
7:30 AM - 8:25 AM

Registration and Breakfast, sponsored by AOL

8:30 AM - 9:00 AM Keynote Address:
Cameron Kerry: General Counsel, Department of Commerce
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM Plenary Panel: A Clash of Civilizations: The EU and US Negotiate the Future of Privacy
Moderator: Barry Steinhardt
10:30 AM - 11:00 AM Break
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Plenary Panel: Do Not Track: Yaaay or Boooh?
Moderator: Jim Harper

12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Lunch Plenary Panel: Youth, Privacy, and Freedom: Using Libraries to Engage Young People
Moderator: Deborah Caldwell-Stone
1:30 PM - 2:00 PM Keynote Address:
danah boyd: Microsoft
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM (Not Video Streamed) (No Online Streaming) Performance and Discussion: 7th Graders Present the Play Galella v. Onassis
Moderator: Sherry Turkle, Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor, MIT

(Live video streaming) Workshop: The Global Challenge of Mandatory Data Retention Schemes
Moderator: Cedric Laurant

Tutorial: Privacy Policies: What You Need to Know
Moderator: J. Bradley Jansen

Breakout Session for Lawyers: Cutting Edge Issues of Computers, Privacy, and the Law
**Separate registration is required for this section. For more information, contact: cle-cfp2011@epic.org. Please indicate if you would like to receive CLE Credit!
Moderator: Andrew Grosso

3:30 PM - 3:45 PM Break
3:45 PM - 5:15 PM Plenary Panel: How Private are Electronic Health Records and Health Information Exchanges?
Moderator: Dr. Deborah Peel
5:15 PM - 5:45 PM

Keynote Address:
Edith Ramirez: FTC Commissioner

Wednesday, June 15, 2011
EST
(UTC 4)
Atrium Hart Auditorium - Video Streaming Room A - Video Streaming Room B Room C Room D
7:30 AM - 8:25 AM Registration and Breakfast
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Keynote Address:
Mona Eltahawy

9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Plenary Panel: Cybersecurity Beyond the Kill Switch: Government Powers and Cybersecurity Policy
Moderator: Greg Nojeim

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM Break
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Plenary Panel: The Effect of Domestic Airport Security Policies on Minority Communities, Freedom of Movement, and Privacy
Moderator: Daniel Mach

Discussion: The Unintended Consequences of US Government Trade Overreach on Internet Freedom: The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement
Moderator: Manon Ress, Director of Information Society Projects
12:30 PM - 1:30 PM Lunch Discussion: Frontiers in Privacy and Security
Moderator: Annie Anton
Discussion: David vs. Goliath Redux: Individual Rights in the Age of the Vengeful Institution
Moderator: Evan Hendricks
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Workshop: Don't kill "GRAMA!" How Open Meetings Laws are Being Affected by Social Media and New Technology
Moderator: Andy Wilson
Workshop: Intermediary Immunity under Section 230
Moderator: Paul Levy
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM Break
3:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Plenary Panel: MENA Beyond Stereotypes: Technology of Good and Evil Before, During and After Revolutions
Moderator: Meryem Marzouki

5:30 PM - 6:00 PM

Reflections on Technologies of Good and Evil with Bob Boorstin
Moderator: Deborah Hurley

Thursday, June 16, 2011
EST
(UTC 4)
Atrium Hart Auditorium - Video Streaming Room A - Video Streaming Room B Room C Room D
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM Registration and Breakfast
8:30 AM - 9:00 AM Keynote Address:
Alessandro Acquisti: Associate Professor, Heinz College at Carnegie Mellon University
9:00 AM - 10:30 AM

Plenary Panel: Cybersecurity, Freedom and Privacy
Moderator:
Marc Rotenberg

10:30 AM - 10:45 AM Break

One-on-One Discussions: Research Poster Sessions (Discussions will take place at the Research Poster Displays in the Atrium Common Area of the Venue. Posters will be on display in the Atrium all day.)

10:45 AM - 11:45 AM Workshop: Accessible and Usable Technologies Support the Freedom of People with Disabilities
Moderator: Jenifer Simpson
Workshop: Social Justice in the Digital Information Age
Moderator: Chip Pitts
Workshop: Automating Policing Functions: From Drones to Robo Ticketing: Is this the end of Police As we Know Them?
Moderator: Tara Whalen
One-on-One Tutorials: Privacy and Personal Computing
11:45 AM - 12:00 PM
12:00 PM - 12:45 PM Lunch (No Online Video Streaming) Movie Screening: Erasing David
Moderator: David Bond
Tutorial: Technology Behind the Challenge to Location Privacy
Topic One: Geolocation: Risks and Rewards (60 minutes)
Topic Two: Privacy for Mobile Users: Laptops, Location-Based Services, and Location Sharing (30 minutes)
12:45 PM - 1:30 PM
1:30 PM - 2:00 PM Keynote Address:
Bruce Schneier
2:00 PM - 2:30 PM Keynote Address:
Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT): Judiciary Committee Chair
2:30 PM - 2:45 PM Break
2:45 PM - 3:00 PM Winners of the CPF 2011 Research Poster Session
Moderator: Jeremy Epstein
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM Tutorials: Technology, Security, & Privacy
Presenters: Dr. Roger Johnston, Ph.D., CPP; Dr. Simson Garfinkel; Tom Kowalick
3:30 PM - 3:45 PM Workshop: Technology Solutions for Maintaining Privacy of Health Care Records: Past, Current, and Future
Moderator: Dr. Latanya Sweeney
Discussion: The Privacy Profession -- Corporate Apologists, or Agents of Positive Change?
Moderator: Trevor Hughes
3:45 PM - 4:15 PM Workshop: The Future is Now - the Smart Grid, Should it Mean Living in a Glass House?
Moderator: Michelle De Mooy
4:15 PM - 4:30 PM
4:30 PM - 4:45 PM
4:45 PM - 5:45 PM Plenary Panel: The Privacy Tipping Point?
Moderator: Cecilia Kang
5:45 PM - 6:00 PM Closing Ceremony: CFP2011

Panel Descriptions

A Clash of Civilizations: The EU and US Negotiate the Future of Privacy

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Hart Auditorium
Europe and the US have very different ideas on what laws and institutions are needed to protect privacy. High level negotiations between the EU and US will set the international standards for the use of personal data by governments and the private sector. Government officials and experts from both sides of the Atlantic will explore those differences and discuss what is at stake for Americans and the world.
Moderator: Barry Steinhardt: Founder, Friends of Privacy USA; Senior Advisor and Trustee, Privacy International; Member of the DHS Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee
Panelists:
Jan Philipp Albrecht: Member of the European Parliament from the German Greens
Mary Ellen Callahan: Chief Privacy Officer, Department of Homeland Security
Edward Hasbrouck: The Identity Project
Viviane Reding (via pre-recorded message): Vice President, European Commission
Frank Schmiedel: First Secretary, Washington D.C. Delegation of the European Union, Political, Security & Development Section
(Back to Top)

Do Not Track: Yaaay or Boooh?

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Hart Auditorium
"Do-Not-Track" is the idea that Web surfers should have easy-to-use protection against tracking by ad networks. This panel will explore the merits and demerits of the Do-Not-Track concept, the various technical options for implementing Do-Not-Track, and the legal and regulatory implications of each.
Moderator: Jim Harper: Director of Information Policy Studies, CATO; Member, Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee of the Department of Homeland Security
Panelists:
Ryan Radia: Associate Director of Technology Studies, Competitive Enterprise Institute
Berin Szoka: Founder, TechFreedom
Chris Soghoian: Graduate Fellow, Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research; Ph.D. Candidate, School of Information and Computing at Indiana University
Harlan Yu: Ph.D. Student, Department of Computer Science, Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University
Andy Zeigler: Program Manager, Microsoft's Internet Explorer Engineering Team
Dr. Ed Felten: Chief Technologist, Federal Trade Commission
(Back to Top)

Youth, Privacy, and Freedom: Using Libraries to Engage Young People

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Room A (Alternate Lunch Activity)
The American Library Association hosts this discussion on the future of privacy advocacy - and future legal and policy decisions that can help ensure privacy rights and protections - which will depend on young people's awareness of the importance of personal privacy and how government surveillance chills liberties. This panel will explore the effective use of libraries to reach out and engage with youth on privacy, surveillance, and civil liberties issues and report on key findings from the ALA's Youth and Privacy Conference, held in March 2011.
Moderator: Deborah Caldwell-Stone: Deputy Director, Office for Intellectual Freedom, American Library Association (ALA)
Panelists:
Barbara Jones: Director, Office for Intellectual Freedom, American Library Association (ALA)
Michael Zimmer: Assistant Professor, School of Information Studies, University of Wisconsin
Buck Methfessel: Senior Counsel for Information and Technology, Office of the General Counsel, U.S. Department of Education
Alex Koroknay-Palicz: Executive Director, National Youth Rights Association
Room seats 148. Overflow will be directed to Room B, where content will be cybercast.
(Back to Top)

7th Graders Present the Play Galella v. Onassis

Students of Oakland Public Schools, NJ Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Hart Auditorium
Hear the next generation debate privacy and the right to be left alone. A group of seventh graders who participated in a National History Day competition will give their presentation on Galella v. Onassis, the case about paparazzi. The students will present a play, featuring Ron Galella's notorious pursuit of Jacqueline Kennedy and her children, and reenacting the trial that followed. The students contacted Galella himself, and interviewed Jackie's lawyer. The will be prepared to answer the question: Do you have any expectation of privacy in public?
Moderator: Sherry Turkle: Abby Rockefeller Mauzé Professor, MIT
(Back to Top)

The Global Challenge of Mandatory Data Retention Schemes

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM (Panel Twitter hashtag: #dataretention) (Live video streaming)
Room A
Mandatory data retention schemes compel Internet service and telecom providers to collect and store data about everyone's communications and Internet transactions, raising dire privacy and freedom of expression and association concerns. This panel will describe mandatory data retention regimes in the EU, and will highlight the latest developments in the US and Latin America. Panelists will share research and evidence gathered under five years of mandatory data retention policies in Europe.
Moderator: Cedric Laurant: Senior Research Fellow, CMCS, CEU (Hungary); Legal Researcher, ICRI (K.U.Leuven) (Belgium)
Panelists:
Dr. Thilo Weichert: Privacy Commissioner of Schleswig-Holstein and Kirsten Bock, Head of European Privacy Seal (EuroPriSe) at the German Schleswig-Holstein data protection authority in Germany (Unabhaengiges Landeszentrum fuer Datenschutz, ULD) and International Coordinator at ULD
Katarzyna Szymielewicz: Panoptykon (Poland)
Lee Tien : Electronic Frontier Foundation (USA)
Ronaldo Lemos: Fundação Getulio Vargas (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); Princeton University (USA)
Ralf Bendrath : Working Group on Data Retention (Germany)
Malte Spitz : Member and International Coordinator, Federal Executive Board, Green Party (Germany)
(Back to Top)

Privacy Policies: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
Room B
International and US governmental policies and laws affect your day-to-day privacy in many ways. Get an update on the latest privacy trends and learn how legal and technological changes (including upcoming legislation and the cloud computing revolution) will affect you. Learn how to dissect corporate policies based on your own personal preferences to find privacy policies that fit your needs. CPE Credits available.
Moderator: J. Bradley Jansen: Director, Center for Financial Privacy and Human Rights
Panelists:
Monique Altheim, Esq.: CIPP, EDiscoveryMap.com
Ross Schulman: Public Policy and Regulatory Counsel, Computer & Communications Industry Association
Steve Meyer: Chain of Evidence
(Back to Top)

How Private are Electronic Health Records and Health Information Exchanges?

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 3:45 PM - 5:15 PM
Hart Auditorium
This plenary will "draw back the curtain" to examine how electronic health records (EHRs) and data exchanges will affect privacy in the US. The federal government is actively promoting untested systems for biosurveillance, research, use and disclosure of every American's health data, both inside and outside the healthcare system.
Moderator: Dr. Deborah Peel: Executive Director, Patient Privacy Rights
Panelists:
Michael Stearns, M.D., CPC, CFPC: President and Chief Executive Officer, e-MDs
Mark Frisse, M.D.: Professor of Management, Vanderbilt Owen Graduate School of Management; Accenture Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University
Carl Gunter, Ph.D.: Director, Illinois Security Lab; Center for Health Information Privacy and Security; Strategic Advanced Research Projects on Security (SHARPS)
Stephanie Perrin: Canadian Privacy Expert
Deven McGraw: Director of the Health Privacy Project, Center for Democracy and Technology
Dave deBronkart: "e-Patient Dave" deBronkart, Cancer patient, blogger, speaker, health IT advocate, co-chair, Society for Participatory Medicine
(Back to Top)

Cybersecurity Beyond the Kill Switch: Government Powers and Cybersecurity Policy

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 9:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Hart Auditorium
While there is now broad consensus that the U.S. government should not have the power to "shut down the Internet," other powers over private sector networks remain under discussion. Policymakers have proposed government authorities to mandate IT system design for private networks, to collect and analyze content from those networks, and to remove those networks from contact with the wider Internet. Experts will discuss these suggestions, their civil liberties and commercial implications, and possible alternatives. Panel organized by Joshua Gruenspecht: Cybersecurity Fellow, Center for Democracy and Technology.
Moderator: Greg Nojeim: Senior Counsel and Director of Project on Freedom, Security and Technology, Center for Democracy and Technology
Panelists:
Liesyl Franz: Vice President for Cybersecurity and Global Public Policy, TechAmerica
Susan Morgan: Executive Director, Global Network Initiative
Micah Sherr: Assistant Professor of Computer Science, Georgetown University
Michael Seeds: Legislative Director, Representative Mac Thornberry
(Back to Top)

Panel Topic: The Effect of Domestic Airport Security Policies on Minority Communities, Freedom of Movement, and Privacy

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 11:00 AM - 12:30 AM
Hart Auditorium
This panel will discuss how new and invasive aviation security policies are impacting minority communities in the U.S. and whether the national security objectives outweigh the impingement on civil liberties. Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) machines in U.S. airports that have raised questions of privacy, modesty, health, and racial/ religious profiling. For example, AIT's inability to scan the folds or layers of religious headcoverings (i.e. Sikh turbans are considered per se an anomaly, and therefore, subject Sikh passengers who wear turbans to two mandatory additional layers of security). This counters the argument that invasive technology provides additional security. This technology also disparately impacts Muslim women who wear hijabs or women and men who wear artificial hair pieces wigs based on preference, medical purposes, or religious obligations regarding natural hair being uncovered in public. Moreover, the panel may discuss other law enforcement mechanisms to combat terrorism and other emerging technologies or law enforcement tools in the aviation security arena. And generally, the panel will discuss how these new aviation security policies have an impact on individual's Freedom of Movement. Panel organized by Hansdeep Singh: Staff Attorney, United Sikhs.
Moderator: Daniel Mach: Director of Freedom of Religion and Belief, ACLU
Panelists:
Congresswoman Judy Chu (introduction)
Kimberly Walton: Special Counselor to the Administrator, TSA (invited)
Paul Uppal: Member, UK Parliament
Chris Calabrese: Legal Counsel on Technology and Liberty, ACLU
Ginger McCall: Open Government Counsel, EPIC
Nadhira Al-Khalili, Esq.: Legal Counsel, Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR)
(Back to Top)

The Unintended Consequences of US Government Trade Overreach on Internet Freedom: The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM
Room A
The U.S. is negotiating a multilateral free trade agreement, the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP), with eight carefully selected countries from Asia and the Pacific. The US proposal of the TPP contains provisions that will have consequences for the Internet and internet service providers (ISPs), by implicating obligations and legal liabilities. The proposal would have consequences for access to knowledge, freedom and privacy. We seek to engage a broad audience in this dialogue. Panel organized by Krista Cox: Knowledge Ecology International (KEI).
Moderator: Manon Ress: Knowledge Ecology International
Panelists:
Alberto Cerda Silva: Professor of Law, University of Chile
Matthew Schruers: Vice President of Law & Policy, Computer & Communications Industry Association
Rashmi Rangnath :Director, Global Knowledge Initiative and Staff Attorney Public Knowledge
(Back to Top)

Frontiers in Privacy and Security

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Room A (Alternate Lunch Activity)
An examination of key current issues involving privacy and security. Daniel Solove is the author of the new book, Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security. Peter Swire is a law professor and two-time White House official. In this session, they will do short "chapters" about six topics. As the tentative agenda, Dan will take the lead and Peter will comment on: (1) the "all or nothing" fallacy in privacy and security; (2) the "nothing to hide" argument; and (3) the future scope of the Fourth Amendment. Peter will take the lead on: (1) encryption and globalization (updates on India, China, and Russia); (2) social networks, freedom of association, and privacy; and (3) data minimization in our data-drenched age.
Moderator: Annie Antón, Professor of Computer Science, NCSU College of Engineering
Panelists:
Daniel Solove, John Marshall Harlan Research Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School
Peter Swire, C. William O’Neill Professor of Law at the Moritz College of Law of the Ohio State University
Room seats 148. Overflow will be directed to Room B, where content will be cybercast.
(Back to Top)

David vs. Goliath Redux: Individual Rights in the Age of the Vengeful Institution

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 12:30 PM - 1:30 PM
Evan Hendricks, Privacy Times.
(Back to Top)

Don't kill "GRAMA!" How Open Meetings Laws Are Being Affected by Social Media and New Technology

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Hart Auditorium
Open Records and Meetings laws have come under assault by lawmakers who are so ignorant of electronic communication and social media that their first inclination is simply to exempt it from all requirements of good government law. Utah lawmakers gutted their open records law earlier this year, known as GRAMA, in an attempt to keep their emails and blackberry messages private. How are other states and the Federal government dealing with these issues, and what should they be doing? Panel organized by Andy Wilson: Policy Analyst, Public Citizen Texas.
Moderator: Andy Wilson: Policy Analyst, Public Citizen Texas
Panelists:
Joe Newman: Director of Communications, Project on Government Oversight (POGO)
Annabel Park: Founder and Spokesperson, Coffee Party USA
Daniel Schuman: Policy Counsel and Director of the Advisory Committee on Transparency, Sunlight Foundation
(Back to Top)

Intermediary Immunity under Section 230

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Room A
Fifteen years after Section 230 was enacted, there are continuing calls to scrap it or amend it to prevent a variety of ills, be it child pornography, sexual exploitation, anonymous defamation, online bullying, or violation of the "right to forget." Has the Internet outgrown Section 230 or is it still a vital protection for online free speech? If the Section should be amended, what changes are needed? Panel organized by Paul Levy: Attorney, Public Citizen Litigation Group.
Moderator: Paul Levy: Attorney, Public Citizen Litigation Group
Panelists:
Eric Goldman: Law Professor, Santa Clara Law School
Maria Crimi Speth: Shareholder, Jaburg & Wilk, P.C.
Gavin Sutter: Queen Mary Law School (London)
(Back to Top)

MENA Beyond Stereotypes: Technology of Good and Evil Before, During and After Revolutions

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Hart Auditorium
Panelists, including online human rights activists, from and/or focusing on the Middle-East and North Africa will deconstruct the 'Facebook and Twitter revolutions' myth by analyzing the role of communication technologies before, during and after revolutions and the role played by local and foreign policy in the region, pre- and post-revolutions. Panel organized by Meryem Marzouki: Senior Researcher in Political Sciences, CNRS/UPMC (France).
Moderator: Meryem Marzouki: Senior Researcher in Political Sciences, CNRS/UPMC (France)
Panelists:
Amira Al Hussaini: MENA Regional Editor, Global Voices (Bahrain)
Moez Chakchouk: CEO, Tunisian Internet Agency (Tunisia)
Deborah Hurley (USA)
Jillian C. York: Director of Internet Freedom of Expression, EFF (USA)
Nasser Weddady: Outreach Director, HAMSA; American Islamic Congress (USA)
(Back to Top)

Reflections on Technologies of Good and Evil with Bob Boorstin

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 5:30 PM - 6:00 PM
Hart Auditorium
A discussion with Bob Boorstin, Director of Public Policy for Google, reflecting on the previous panel and on how the two-sided potential of technology as a tool for political empowerment is playing out in areas of the world beyond the Middle-East and North Africa. Moderated by Deborah Hurley.
Moderator: Deborah Hurley (USA)
Discussant: Bob Boorstin: Director of Public Policy, Google, Inc. (USA)
(Back to Top)

Cybersecurity Freedom and Privacy

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 8:50 AM - 10:30 AM
Hart Auditorium
This panel will explore the comprehensive approach to cybersecurity being proposed by governments both in the US and around the world. These global initiatives seek to protect digital information systems and the information they manage from all threats. The category of threats will include those faced by governments, consumers, corporations, critical infrastructure, and networked local, state, and national government agencies. The challenges are not only domestic, but international in scope. This panel will explore the topic of Cybersecurity Freedom and Privacy as they outline the roles that governments, companies, users, and advocates can play or should play in attempting to create a free and safe Internet. Some Questions for the Panel: Policing cyberspace is it necessary? And if so, who should be responsible: one agency or many? Will either diplomacy, military, law enforcement, advocacy community or users win the day or will they each be needed to make a 24-7 world work in harmony? Panel organized by Lillie Coney': Associate Director, Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC).
Moderator:
Marc Rotenberg
: Executive Director, Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC)
: Washington Post
Panelists:
Dr. Mouhamadou LO: Legal Advisory, Computing Agency of Senegal, Presidency of the Republic of Senegal
Dr. Lo's Presentation: English; French
Pradeep K. Khosla: Dean of the College of Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
'Ross Anderson: Professor of Security Engineering, University of Cambridge
Timothy Edgar: Senior Legal Advisory to the Information Sharing Environment, Office of the Director of National Intelligence
Joe Onek: Principal, Raben Group
Stuart Shapiro: Security Scientist, MITRE Corporation
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Accessible and Usable Technologies Support the Freedom of People with Disabilities

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Hart Auditorium
The 21st Century Communications & Video Accessibility Act (P.L. 111-260) was enacted in October 2010 in the U.S. This new law not only updates the Communications Act to make sure existing disability mandates reflect the new digital era in which we live but it also substantively impacts multiple technologies operating in and around cyberspace. These include the television (broadcast, cable, satellite), telephone (wireless and wireline), information technology and broadband sectors. The panel will provide a summary of the Act, a regulatory status update and provide speculation on how these mandates will impact the rest of cyberspace, either unregulated sectors or internationally. Discussion will focus on how the civil rights of people with disabilities are advanced when there is accessibility and usability of technology. Panel organized by Jenifer Simpson: Senior Director of Governmental Affairs, American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD).
Moderator: Jenifer Simpson: Senior Director of Governmental Affairs, American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)
Panelists:
Mark Richert: Director of Public Policy, American Foundation for the Blind (AFB)
Eric Bridges: Director of Advocacy and Governmental Affairs, American Council of the Blind (ACB)
Jim House: Director of Public Relations, Telecommunications for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Inc. (TDI)
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Social Justice in the Digital Information Age

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Room A
This round table discussion among civil rights and civil liberties experts in the US will consider a number of challenges to their work in the new millennium. Computing technology is integrating itself into every aspect of domestic life. Education, employment, and housing opportunities are found more and more often only online. Changing laws regarding the use of CCTV, traffic cameras, are blanketing the landscape with means for cash strapped regions to find new revenue. Employment opportunities are more often only available through web-forms that collect personal information that can be instantly matched with other data that could disqualify a candidate because of poor credit scores. Voting rights are on shifting ground that may require a host of actions by voters who have voted for decades in order for them to cast a ballot in next year's election. Immigrant or citizen there is no one way to know--but efforts at finding the way of knowing the difference, and then according civil rights to one while withholding rights to those who cannot pass the test.
Moderator: Chip Pitts: Lecturer, Stanford Law School
Panelists:
Shahid Buttar: U.S. Bill of Rights Defense Committee (Modern COINTELPRO)
Sharon Goott Nissim: Consumer Rights Counsel, EPIC (Employee Rights)
Johnny Barnes: ACLU District of Columbia (Surveillance and Civil Liberties)
Grisella M. Martinez: Director of Policy and Legislative Affairs, National Immigration Forum
Wendy Weiser Director of Democracy Program Voting Rights : Brennan Center for Justice New York Law
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Automating Policing Functions: From Drones to Robo Ticketing, Is This the end of Police As we Know Them?

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 10:45 AM - 12:00 PM
Room B
Drone aircraft are beginning to appear in the skies over America. Police, entrepreneurs, and hobbyists are experimenting with this technology, but safety concerns on the part of the FAA have held back their deployment. As those issues are worked out, however, we face the prospect of cheap and pervasive flying robotic video cameras, often equipped with advanced imaging technologies. There are unmanned vehicles along highways and road ways monitoring the speed of passing vehicles and camera flashes capturing license plates of passing vehicles. CCTV surveillance systems are flowering in cities as fast as grants can purchase them, with shrinking budgets for local and state governments are they seen as a way out of fiscal crisis. RFID tagging of drivers licenses and tag readers couple to monitor people in public and private spaces without their knowledge. GPS tracking devices are cheap and easy to deploy by line officers to track vehicles over distances and for periods far longer and for much lower costs than manned surveillance units. Panel organized by Jay Stanley: Senior Policy Analyst, ACLU Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project.
Moderator: Tara Whalen: IT Research Analyst, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada
Panelists:
Jay Stanley: Senior Policy Analyst, ACLU Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project
Vernon M. Keenan: Director, Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI)
Rainey Reitman: Activism Director, Electronic Frontier Foundation
Richard Power: Director of Strategic Communications, CyLab, Carnegie Mellon University
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Research Poster Session Discussions

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 12:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Atrium
Selected Submissions Provide One-on-One Discussions on Research Poster Submissions.

  • Surveillance Cameras and Arrests in Newark, NJ: Grayson Barber and Marc Beebe (Grayson Barber LLC & ACLU-NJ).
  • The Promise of Privacy-Preserving Computing: Yan Huang, David Evans and Jonathan Katz (University of Virginia & University of Maryland).
  • Token Attempt: The Misrepresentation of Website Privacy Policies through the Misuse of P3P Compact Policy Tokens: Pedro Leon, Lorrie Cranor, Aleecia Mcdonald and Robert Mcguire (Carnegie Mellon University).
  • Nudging Users Towards Privacy on Mobile Devices: Rebecca Balebako, Pedro Leon, Hazim Almuhimed, Patrick Gage Kelly, Jonathan Mugan, Alessandro Acquisti, Lorrie Faith Cranor and Norman Sadeh (Carnegie Mellon University).
  • Faces of Facebook: Face Recognition and Web 2.0: Alessandro Acquisti and Ralph Gross (Carnegie Mellon University).
  • When Are Users Comfortable Sharing Locations with Advertisers?: Patrick Gage Kelley, Michael Benisch, Lorrie Faith Cranor and Norman Sadeh (Carnegie Mellon University).
  • "I regretted the minute I pressed share": A Qualitative Study of Regrets on Facebook: Yang Wang, Gregory Norcie, Saranga Komanduri, Pedro Leon, Lorrie Cranor and Alessandro Acquisti (Carnegie Mellon University).
  • The Illusion of Privacy Control: The Case of Third-Party Apps on Facebook: Na Wang, Jens Grossklags and Heng Xu (Pennsylvania State University).
  • Cloud-based Onion Routing: Creating Economies of Scale for Anonymity: Matvey Arye, Nicholas Jones, Jacopo Cesareo and Michael Freedman (Princeton University).
  • Dimensions of Risk Perception for Online Risks: Vaibhav Garg and Jean Camp (Indiana University).


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Technology Behind the Challenge to Locational Privacy

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Room B (Alternate Lunch Activity)

  • Topic One: Geolocation: Risks and Rewards
    James Kasprzak: Professor of Systems Management, National Defense University;
    James Churbuck: Assistant Professor of Systems Management, National Defense University

    An overview of Geolocation, including its history and technology, and the policy implications for privacy and information assurance. Various types of geolocation technologies are covered, from GPS to cell phone apps. Each topic will be illustrated and presented to the audience for comment and analysis. The session will be wrapped up with some consideration of trends in geolocation, some predictions for the future, and suggestions for the preservation of privacy. 60 minutes.
  • Topic Two: Privacy for Mobile Users: Laptops, Location-Based Services and Location-Sharing
    Janne Lindqvist: Carnegie Mellon University

    What kind of information leaks about you every time you open your laptop, even before you have had the chance to do anything with your computer? What kinds of privacy risks are there in using location-based services? Why do people check-in on foursquare despite the numerous research reports of concerns about location-sharing technologies? In this tutorial, we discuss privacy problems and solutions with laptops, location-based services and location-sharing systems. 30 minutes.


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Movie Screening: Erasing David

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Room A (Alternate Lunch Activity)
David Bond lives in one of the most intrusive surveillance states in the world. He decides to find out how much private companies and the government know about him by putting himself under surveillance and attempting to disappear, a decision that changes his life forever. Leaving his pregnant wife and young child behind, he is tracked across the database state on a chilling journey that forces him to contemplate the meaning of privacy and the loss of it.
Moderator: David Bond
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Winners of the CPF 2011 Research Poster Session

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 2:45 PM - 4:15 PM
Hart Auditorium
Computers, Freedom & Privacy will feature a research showcase in the form of a research poster session as well as a research panel that includes the authors of the best research posters. For more than a decade, CFP has anticipated policy trends and issues, and has shaped the public debate on the future of privacy and freedom in an ever more technology-filled world. CFP focuses on topics such as freedom of speech, privacy, intellectual property, cybersecurity, telecommunications, electronic democracy, digital rights and responsibilities, and the future of technologies and their implications. Researchers who work in any of these areas were invited to submit research abstracts.
Moderator: Jeremy Epstein: SRI International
Winners:
Rebecca Balebako: Carnegie Mellon University. "Nudging Users Towards Privacy on Mobile Devices" "Recent behavioral research on "soft" or "asymmetric" paternalism has begun exploring ways of helping people make better decisions in different aspects of their lives. We apply that research to privacy decision making, investigating how soft paternalistic solutions (also known as nudges) may be used to counter cognitive biases and ameliorate privacy-sensitive behavior. We present the theoretical background of our research, and highlight current industry solutions and research endeavors that could be classified as nudging interventions. We then describe our ongoing work on embedding soft paternalistic mechanisms in location sharing technologies and Twitter privacy agents.
Pedro Leon: Carnegie Mellon University. "Token Attempt: The Misrepresentation of Website Privacy Policies through the Misuse of P3P Compact Policy Tokens"
Recent behavioral research on "soft" or "asymmetric" paternalism has begun exploring ways of helping people make better decisions in different aspects of their lives. We apply that research to privacy decision making, investigating how soft paternalistic solutions (also known as nudges) may be used to counter cognitive biases and ameliorate privacy-sensitive behavior. We present the theoretical background of our research, and highlight current industry solutions and research endeavors that could be classified as nudging interventions. We then describe our ongoing work on embedding soft paternalistic mechanisms in location sharing technologies and Twitter privacy agents.
Na Wang: Pennsylvania State University. "The Illusion of Privacy Control: the Case of Third-Party Apps on Facebook"
We study the information economy created between social networking sites and third-party applications. In particular, we analyze the privacy practices from the 1800 most popular social applications available on Facebook. We identify a number of challenges at the interface between the representation of material terms to the user and the underlying information collection and transmission mechanisms. To address these obstacles, we propose a new design for third-party applications' installation dialogs to provide users with a more effective notice and consent experience.
Ralph Gross: Carnegie Mellon University. "Faces of Facebook: Face Recognition and Web 2.0"
We investigate the technical feasibility of combining online Web 2.0 data with off-the-shelf face recognition technology for the purpose of individual re-identification. The results highlight the privacy risks associated with the convergence of face recognition technologies and increasing online self-disclosures.
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Technology, Security & Privacy

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Room D

  • Topic One: Physical Security, Security Theater, and Snake Oil
    Roger Johnston, Ph.D., CPP: Leader of the Vulunerability Assessment Team at Argonne National Laboratory

    Effective cyber and information security requires good physical security. Physical security, however, is not a very well developed field. It is dominated by wishful thinking, denial, groupthink, bureaucracy, sloppy reasoning, hype, and "Security Theater". This talk by the head of the Vulnerability Assessment Team at Argonne National Laboratory discusses some of the problems and offers practical suggestions for having better security (both physical and cyber).
  • Topic Two: Hard Drives, Encryption, Forensics, and Privacy
    Simson Garfinkel: Associate Professor, Naval Postgraduate School

    Stored data from computer hard drives, digital cameras and cell phones is increasingly playing a role in criminal investigations and military operations. Specialized computer forensic tools make it possible for analysts to recover deleted files, view long-forgotten webmail exchanges, and even capture passwords and encryption keys out of memory. Digital forensics has created powerful tools that can counter the increasing advantage that technology has given to criminals, drug dealers, and terrorists.
  • Topic Three: Automotive Black Box Initiatives
    Tom Kowalick: Co-chair, IEEE P1616 Working Group

    The NHTSA began two (2) rulemakings in 2011. One would establish a new Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) to mandate the installation of Event Data Recorders (EDR) in millions of light vehicles. The second would expand the utility of the amount and type of data EDRs capture in the event of a crash. This presentation examines issues of EDR consumer protection and also offers a simple turn-key solution to protect the security, integrity and authenticity of crash data. Specifically, vehicle owners must "own" EDR data, become "aware" of EDR existence and functioning and must "control access" to the EDR data in their vehicles.


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Technology Solutions for Maintaining Privacy of Health Care Records: Past, Current, and Future

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM
Room A
Discussion of past, current, and future technology solutions for maintaining privacy of healthcare records; summarize the strengths and shortcomings of the existing solutions; understand the challenges of information sharing in Electronic Health Records (EHRs), and what they mean for patient safety, quality of life improvements, and enabling discoveries that lead to cure or better treatments.
Moderator: Dr. Latanya Sweeney
Panelists:
Dr. Vinterbo: Associate Professor of Biomedical Informatics, University of California San Diego
Dr. Jiang: Postdoctoral Fellow with Dr. Ohno-Machado, Division of Biomedical Informatics (DBMI), University of California San Diego
Dr. Jaideep Vaidya: Associate Professor of Computer Information Systems, Rutgers University
Dr. El Emam: Associate Professor, School of Information Technology and Engineering, University of Ottawa
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The Privacy Profession -- Corporate Apologists, or Agents of Positive Change?

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Room C
Much of the recent privacy debate in the United States and Europe centers around the concepts of Privacy by Design and the need for companies and organizations to be more accountable for the information they collect and use. At the center of these efforts are the privacy professionals who shape how companies and organizations govern data. But are these professionals merely looking to justify and defend poor practices or are they positive agents for change helping to better protect privacy?
Moderator: Trevor Hughes: President and CEO, International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP)
Panelists:
Mary Ellen Callahan: Chief Privacy Officer, Department of Homeland Security
Nuala O'Connor Kelly: Senior Counsel and Information Governance & Chief Privacy Leader, General Electric
Jonathan Cantor: Chief Privacy Officer, Department of Commercem,

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The Future is Now - the Smart Grid, Should it Mean Living in a Glass House?

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 3:45 PM - 4:45 PM
Room B
The term "Smart Grid" encompasses a host of inter-related technologies rapidly moving into public use to reduce or better manage electricity consumption. Smart grid systems may be designed to allow electricity service providers, users, or third party electricity usage management service providers to monitor and control electricity use. The electricity service providers may view a smart grid system as a way to precisely locate power outages so that technicians can be dispatched to mitigate problems. Pro-environment policymakers may view a smart grid as key to reducing energy consumption. Law enforcement may view smart grid as a tool to identify, track, and manage information associated with people of interest in investigations. National security may see smart grid systems as a means to manage and redirect the flow of electricity across large areas to address crisis or threats. Marketers may view smart grid systems as another opportunity to learn more about consumers and how they use the items they purchase. Finally, consumers, if given control over their smart grid energy usage information may find it beneficial in making better informed decisions regarding their energy consumption. Panel organized by Linda Sherry: Consumer Action.
Moderator: Michelle de Mooy: Consumer Action
Panelists:
Lillie Coney: Associate Director, Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) (introduction)
Jeff Brueggeman: Vice President of Public Policy, AT&T
Michael D. Oldak: Vice President and General Counsel, Utilities Telecom Council (UTC)
Brent Struthers: Senior Director of State Government Relations, Neustar, Inc.
Lee Tien: Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF)
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The Privacy Tipping Point?

Thursday, June 16, 2011; 4:45 PM - 5:45 PM
Hart Auditorium
As the Orwellian real-time data tracking and auctioning off of individuals is adopted throughout the world, including in repressive regimes, are we witnessing the creation of a combined political and commercial surveillance society? U.S.-based companies and technologies are transforming the global digital marketplace, including through the development of far-reaching approaches designed to integrate advanced data collection techniques with applications that influence unconscious behavior. All the leading digital marketing companies and many global advertisers, for example, are using forms of neuromarketing designed to bypass conscious decision-making, including Yahoo, Google and Microsoft. U.S. companies are also in the forefront of exporting technologies and a business model--known as real-time bidding--where users are bought and sold in milliseconds. Such practices are now found in both the EU and in Asia, including in regimes with human rights violations. Online marketers throughout the world propose a largely uniform approach to ensuring privacy safeguards for such practices--principally self-regulation. There are also new possibilities for the personal management of data profiles proposed to address such concerns. This panel will explore the latest developments in technologically advanced personalized data targeting, the role of the leading online marketing companies, new approaches to policy and safeguard development, and implications to the future of democracy and human rights.
Moderator: Cecilia Kang: Washington Post
Panelists:
Jeff Chester: Center for Digital Democracy
Fran Maier: TRUSTe
Cédric Laurant: Cedric Laurant Consulting
Noah Lang: Reputation.com
Tamir Israel: Technology Lawyer, CIPPIC
Scott B. Meyer: CEO, Evidon
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Breakout Session for Lawyers - CLE Available on Request

Cutting Edge Issues of Computers, Privacy, and the Law
Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Room C
Moderator: Andrew Grosso: Principal, Andrew Grosso & Associates.

  • Topic One: United States v. Antoine Jones: The Fourth Amendment and GPS Tracking
    At this time, the U.S. Department of Justice is seeking certiorari to the U.S. Supreme Court for review of the en banc decision of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of United States v. Jones, where the appellate court threw out evidence obtained by law enforcement through the use of a GPS tracking device attached to a suspect's car in violation of the terms of the warrant. Other courts, including the panel decision preceding the en banc decision of the D.C..Circuit, have ruled that long-term warrantless GPS surveillance does not violate the Fourth Amendment, relying on the Supreme Court's now ancient decision in the Knotts case. This presentation will examine the legal analysis inherent in both positions, and the repercussions of a Supreme Court decision, either pro or con, on uses of advancing technology in surveillance.
    Presented by Stephen C. Lecklar: Shainis & Peltzman; Appellate Counsel for Mr. Antoine Jones. Leckar served for sixteen years as a mediator for the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and was a member of the Advisory Committee on Rules of the United States Courts of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.
  • Topic Two: Global Networking & Social Media: Data, Privacy & Legal Rights
    Recent hacks and leaks from commercial Internet sites have raised the visibility of the vulnerability of personal and financial information placed online by users of games and other Internet media used for social interaction and networking. The panel will explore the risks taken by users of these sites and networks; the laws available domestically and internationally to protect and enforce the privacy of such data; and proposals for increasing the privacy and security of such data.
    Presented by John L. Nicholson: Attorney, Pillsbury Global Sourcing Group. Mr. Nicholson helps clients structure, negotiate and document complex sourcing transactions. He is also a lead member of the firm's Privacy and Data Protection practice and an active member of the firm's multidisciplinary Social Media, Entertainment & Technology team. Before joining Pillsbury, Mr. Nicholson was the internal project manager for an Oracle implementation at a mid-size company and was the acting director of information technology. Before obtaining his law degree and MBA, Mr. Nicholson was a physicist with the U.S. Department of Energy's Superconducting Super Collider program.
  • Topic Three: Medical Privacy: Electronic Records, HIPAA, and Patient Privacy
    The requirement for health care providers to use Electronic Medical Records to maintain and distribute such records raises the risks to patients whose personal health information and other private data must be maintained. The panel will examine the requirements for Electronic Medical Records; the laws governing and technologies available to implement security for such records; and the risks posed to clients whose information is maintained in such systems of records.
    Presented by Mark Rasch: Director of Cybersecurity and Privacy Consulting, CSC and Walter Metz: General Counsel and Corporate Compliance Offcier, Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center. Mr. Rasch is responsible for developing and implementing a comprehensive strategy for growing the cybersecurity and privacy consulting practice in CSC. Prior to CSC, Rash was president and co-founder of Secure IT Experts, an information security and privacy consulting company. Before that, he held managing director and senior vice president positions at various consulting firms. Earlier in his career, Rasch was with the U.S. Department of Justice where he led the department's efforts to investigate and prosecute cyber and high-technology crime, starting the computer crime unit within the Criminal Division's Fraud Section, efforts which eventually led to the creation of the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section of the Criminal Division. He earned his juris doctor from the State University of New York at Buffalo School of Law and a bachelor's degree in political science from the State University of New York at Albany. Mr. Metz is also a Certified Public Accountant. Among his duties at Brookhaven Hospital are the review of procedures used by hospitals to protect the personal health information of patients.
  • Topic Four: Ethical and Societal Implications of Advances in Military Significant Technology in the Digital, Global and Democratized Environment
    The military, here and abroad, is a great consumer and driver of advanced computer technology. Such technology may be used by various parties to both advance the cause of democratization as well as for control and repression. This panel will examine military-driven developments in computer technology as it affects such matters, particularly in light of recent development sin the Middle East and elsewhere.
    Presented by Dr. Herb Lin: Chief Scientist, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board at the National Research Council of the National Academies. Prior to his NRC service, Dr. Lin was a professional staff member and staff scientist for the House Armed Services Committee (1986-1990), where his portfolio included defense policy and arms control issues. He received his doctorate in physics from MIT.
  • Topic Five: Cloud Computing
    This session will focus on some of the legal issues associated with the new multi tenant environment of cloud computing. It will discuss issues related to venue and jurisdiction, roles and responsibilities of cloud providers, copyright and trademark issues for cloud delivery systems, and the enforceability of cloud contracts.
    Presented by Mark Rasch: Director of Cybersecurity and Privacy Consulting, CSC. For more information on Mr. Rasch, please see above under Topic 3.


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Meals

CFP will be providing a continental breakfast during registration. Box lunches are being provided during the designated times, in the Atrium. No food or drink is allowed in Hart Auditorium, though lunches can be taken into the breakout rooms for sessions taking place over the lunch hour. Light snacks will be providing during breaks.
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Streaming Video

All events in Hart Auditorium and Room A will be simulcast and available for viewing over the Internet.* The link for viewing is here. The stream will be live only during the event. You should have the latest version of Quicktime installed on your computer and make sure that you are not protected by firewalls, which can sometimes block content.
Lunch activities in Room A on Tuesday and Wednesday will be cybercast in Room B once the room meets its capacity.

*Except for 7th Graders Present the Play Galella v. Onassis.
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Evening Events

EPIC Champion of Freedom Awards Dinner

Monday, June 13, 2011; 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
The Fairfax @ Embassy Row
2100 Massachusetts Avenue Northwest
Washington, D.C.
Directions from Venue
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Center for Democracy & Technology Happy Hour

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM
The Dubliner
4 F Street Northwest
Washington, D.C.
Directions from Venue
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Digital Dead End Reading with Author Virginia Eubanks

Tuesday, June 14, 2011; 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Busboys and Poets
2010 14th Street Northwest
Washington, D.C.
202-387-POET
Directions from Venue
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"Mapping Internet Traffic Through NSA Warrantless Wiretapping Sites" and Reception

Wednesday, June 15, 2011; 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Public Citizen
1600 20th Street Northwest
Washington, D.C.
202-588-1000
Directions from Venue
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