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Submission guidelines

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We are no longer accepting program submissions; please see the Program. This page is kept here for historical interest only.

The 21st annual Association for Computing Machinery's "Computers, Freedom, and Privacy" conference invites proposals for this year's conference. This year's conference theme is Computers, Freedom, and Privacy: The Future is Now. We encourage multi-stakeholder participation in the conference as speakers, proposal submitters, and attendees that represent the diverse global community of organizations and professionals who work on policy, technology and law. Proposals that focus on the information society and the future of technology, privacy, innovation and law should be submitted following the guidelines outlined below.

We seek panel proposals that take advantage of this year's location in Washington DC. Experts, the public and policy makers each have a part to play in innovation and in moving policy and technology forward, while preserving basic rights and freedoms.


Contents

Key dates:

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We prefer proposals via the CFP2011 electronic submission system. You may choose to email your proposal. Contact information will be used only for discussions about proposals and to send information about the CFP conference. The Program Committee may accept parts of submissions without accepting the entire submission. For example, the Program Committee frequently combines multiple proposals, or takes a session topic and adds some different speakers. Where submissions are combined with others, the submitters' contributions will be acknowledged in the program. CFP does not generally provide speaker honoraria. We will waive the conference registration fees for speakers from academic, non-profit, and government institutions (except for Birds of a Feather sessions). In addition, travel funding may be available for some speakers through the CFP scholarship programs or on a case-by-case basis.

Speakers, topics, and activities

If you have an idea for a session that you do not want to organize yourself, use the "topic or activity" suggestion form. To nominate a speaker, use the speaker suggestion form.

Panels, workshops, and other sessions

This year CFP will work to bring together thinkers and decision makers from government, business, civil society, academia, and the technology community to provide their perspectives on the state of computing, innovation, freedom, and privacy. Drastic changes have occurred in the number and variety of options available to individuals to share, collect, or store their information. Individuals are no longer limited to national borders but may be moving our world toward new challenges regarding nationality and geographic location. "Cloud computing", "e-health records", "location based services" "cybersecurity", "biometric based identity systems", "Internet credentialing", "social networks as political and social change agents", and "privacy in a networked world" are topics that we encourage you to assist us in exploring.

Questions around rights and responsibilities, fair information practices and national and international norms that protect personal data are being debated in courts, classrooms, policy discussions, international frameworks, and cyber-cafes. Each day CFP 2011 will begin with a thought provoking speaker, presentation, or plenary panel, which will explore the most challenging questions of our time. Workshops in the afternoon will support multi-track sessions that explore topics led by technologists and innovators, policy experts, legal scholars, and advocates on the front line of computing, freedom and privacy.

Example

Tutorials

We are interested in 90 minute workshops and tutorials that explore topics of interest to CFP audiences in greater detail. For example, workshops on Smart Grid, Cloud Computing, Location based services, Privacy Enhancing Technologies, E-Health Records, Cybersecurity, Cyber-Activism, and Technology Innovations to expand opportunities and give data subjects more control over their information are welcomed. Topics will not be limited to technology, but explore policy and law. Where will the courts be on the issue of data collection, use, rights and ownership? The technology is here, but the courts have yet to settle on what rights will be enforceable in cyberspace. Legal and policy experts are encouraged to collaborate with technologists and innovators to frame discussions around questions that the courts must decide in the coming decade.

Tutorials and workshops may be presented by a single presenter or a team of presenters. Tutorials should be submitted by one of the proposed presenters. If you have an idea for a tutorial but are not proposing to present it, please submit it as a "topic or activity" suggestion.

Example

Example tutorial submission

Law and Policy Poster Showcase Poster Session

This year's Computers, Freedom and Privacy Conference will feature a law and policy showcase in the form of a papers-poster session. Selected papers-poster writers/submitters will be invited to participate on a panel. CFP is the leading policy conference exploring the impact of the Internet, computers, and communications technologies on society. For more than a decade, CFP has anticipated policy trends and issues, and has shaped the public debate on the future of privacy and freedom in an ever more technology-filled world. This year's CFP focuses on legal and policy topics that focus on freedom of speech, privacy, cloud computing, cybersecurity, telecommunications, electronic democracy, digital rights and responsibilities, court cases and legal challenges related to privacy and technology and analysis of technology law and policy today. Legal scholars, authors, researchers who work in any of these areas are invited to submit research abstracts.

We seek published abstracts describing recent or ongoing research in all areas relevant to the conference themes. We are especially interested in law and policy abstracts that present emerging issues that the courts have ruled on or may rule on in the coming year. Abstracts should be written for a general audience and should avoid using technical or legal jargon.

Submitted research abstracts can be either unpublished original research (including work in progress), or research that has been recently published (2010 or 2011).

Accepted abstracts or links to published papers will be posted on the CFP web site and authors will be invited to present their work in the form of a poster during a poster session on June 14-16, 2011. The authors of the best research posters will be invited to participate in a panel discussion. Authors of accepted posters will be sent information about how to prepare and format posters for the conference. If you have questions contact Andrew Grosso agrosso AT acm.org.

Submissions will close at 5pm, US East Coast time, the evening of April 3. Chair Andrew Grosso Law and Policy Poster Session.

Research Poster Showcase Poster Session

This year's Computers, Freedom and Privacy Conference will feature a research showcase in the form of a research poster session as well as a research panel that includes the authors of the best research posters. CFP is the leading policy conference exploring the impact of the Internet, computers, and communications technologies on society. For more than a decade, CFP has anticipated policy trends and issues, and has shaped the public debate on the future of privacy and freedom in an ever more technology-filled world. CFP focuses on topics such as freedom of speech, privacy, intellectual property, cybersecurity, telecommunications, electronic democracy, digital rights and responsibilities, and the future of technologies and their implications. Researchers who work in any of these areas are invited to submit research abstracts.

We seek research abstracts describing recent or ongoing research in all areas relevant to the conference themes. We are especially interested in research abstracts that clearly articulated implications for activism or policy. Abstracts should be written for a general audience and should avoid using technical or legal jargon.

Submitted research abstracts can be either unpublished original research (including work in progress), or research that has been recently published (2010 or 2011).

Accepted abstracts or links to published papers will be posted on the CFP web site and authors will be invited to present their work in the form of a poster during a poster session on June 16, 2011. The authors of the best research posters will be invited to participate in a panel discussion.

In the body of the message include the title, authors, and brief abstract. If the research has been published, also include the full citation and URL. Attach a 1-2 page extended abstract or the full paper as a PDF file. Please note that poster abstracts should be formatted like short papers, not like posters. Authors of accepted posters will be sent information about how to prepare and format posters for the conference.

Submissions will close at 5pm, US East Coast time, the evening of April 3.


Research Poster Session Committee

  • Co-chair Serge Egelman, NIST
  • Co-chair Jeremy Epstein, SRI
  • L Jean Camp, Indiana University
  • Janice Tsai, Microsoft
  • Joseph Lorenzo Hall, Princeton
  • Andy Oram, Editor for O'Reilly Media

Birds-of-a-Feather sessions

BOFs are informal evening sessions, usually attended by anywhere from 10 to 50 conference participants. They may include presentations, group discussions, open meetings of organizations, or informal opportunities for people with a common interest to meet each other. BOFs are frequently used as the jumping off point for ongoing collaborative activity on a given technical or policy issue. We encourage BOFs that will lead to future activity. We are particularly interested in innovative ways to educate and communicate with people on a wide range of topics that touch on the theme of this year's CFP. This year we also encourage BOFs not to limit their venue to the conference location or hotel, but explore options to hold interesting topical discussions in settings that provide a suitable frame for the discussions. If you would like to host a reception, party, or other social policy discussion format you are encouraged to use the Birds-of-a-Feather submission process to make suggestions. BOF submitters should be prepared to organize the BOF they submit.

Example

Example BOF session proposal